Examination Results
GCSE and A Level results 2016

GCSE Results

The government has changed the way that it judges the performance of schools. It no longer uses the percentage of students who have gained five A*-C grades but four other measures.

1. A “Progress 8” score. This shows how well students have progressed in the school since they came in from their primary school. A positive score is good. For example, a score of 0.5 would mean that, taken together, each student in each subject did half a grade better than the average of all schools.

Kingsbury High progress 8 score 2016:  + 0.36

Kingsbury High percentile rank 2016: 15th. This means our students made better progress than in 85% of schools throughout the country. 14% of schools did better than us. This is an excellent performance.

2. An “Attainment 8” score. This is the average grade obtained by all of the students in all of the subjects.

Kingsbury High Attainment 8 score 2016: 52.8, equivalent to an average grade of between grades B and C

3. The percentage of pupils who achieved grade C and above in both of English and Maths.

Kingsbury High percentage: 65%

4. The percentage of students who achieved the English Baccalaureate. This means those students who have gained grades A* - C in English, Maths, at least two Sciences, a foreign language and either history or geography. We would emphasise that we do not make it a requirement that students study this particular combination. 

Kingsbury High percentage: 37%
 
A level results 2016

1. In the most recent A level results, 55% of all subjects taken were graded at A*, A and B. We consistently average in excess of 50% on this figure, with a high of 61%.

2. The average grade achieved, taking all students and subjects into account was C-

3. Eight students retook English GCSE in the sixth form: they made on average a one grade improvement on their GCSE grades.

Twenty students retook Maths GCSE in the sixth form: they made on average a 0.7 grade improvement on their GCSE grades.

4. Along with most schools we subscribe to a service called ALPS (A Level Performance System) which grades each school according to how well its students have progressed compared with schools nationally.

Our ALPS grade this year was 2 - the second highest of nine grades. This is considered by ALPS to represent outstanding progress.

The government's own value-added score for the school is + 0.32. This means that our students, on average, progressed one third of a grade more between GCSE and A level compared with the progress made by students nationally.

5. Retention: the proportion of students who reached the end of their programme of study: academic courses: 98%; applied and technical courses: 79%.

6. Destinations: the percentage of students who continue in education or move to training or employment: information awaited